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Asthma attacks declining among U.S. children

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CDC reported Tuesday that children with asthma in the United States are having fewer asthma attacks, missed school days, and trips to the hospital. According to the <i>Vital Signs</i> report, the percentage of children who reported one or more asthma attacks in the preceding year dropped to 53.7% in 2016, from 61.7% in 2001.

CDC reported Tuesday that children with asthma in the United States are having fewer asthma attacks, missed school days, and trips to the hospital. According to the Vital Signs report, the percentage of children who reported one or more asthma attacks in the preceding year dropped to 53.7% in 2016, from 61.7% in 2001. "We are making progress—but health care providers, parents, caregivers, and schools can do more to help children avoid asthma attacks," said CDC Acting Director Anne Schuchat, MD. "Asthma attacks can be terrifying for children and their families. Over the past decade, we've identified asthma management actions that work—not alone but in combination. Now we need to scale up these efforts nationwide." The report found that some children are more likely to have asthma than others, including boys, children aged 5-17 years, non-Hispanic black children, children of Puerto Rican descent, and children from low-income families. Asthma attacks were most common among the youngest children, aged 4 years and younger, in 2016. The report also noted that asthma hospitalizations for children fell from 9.6% in 2003 to 4.7% in 2013, while the percentage of children who reported asthma-related missed school days also dropped during that time period. In addition, more children with asthma are receiving asthma action plans and learning how to recognize the signs and symptoms of an attack and how to respond quickly. While no one strategy will prevent all asthma attacks, recent evidence from small CDC-funded projects indicates that a combination of actions can be very effective. These include working with children and parents to determine the severity of each child's asthma, to develop an action plan for each child, and to share the plan with families, schools, and others; teaching children and parents how to manage asthma by using control and rescue medicine properly and avoiding asthma triggers; and working with community health workers, pharmacists, and other community providers to help ensure that children with asthma receive the services they need.

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https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p0206-vs-childhood-asthma.html

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