Carole L. Kimberlin Receives APhA-APRS Research Achievement Award

The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) announced that Carole L. Kimberlin, PhD, FAPhA, Professor at the University of Florida, is the 2012 recipient of the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS) Research Achievement Award. Kimberlin was chosen for her significant contributions to the area of pharmacist-patient communications, and the impact that her research has had on the pharmacist-patient relationship, medication use and patient health attitudes and behaviors.

The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) announced that Carole L. Kimberlin, PhD, FAPhA, Professor at the University of Florida, is the 2012 recipient of the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS) Research Achievement Award. Kimberlin was chosen for her significant contributions to the area of pharmacist-patient communications, and the impact that her research has had on the pharmacist-patient relationship, medication use and patient health attitudes and behaviors.

The APhA Research Achievement Award is intended to recognize and encourage outstanding, meritorious achievement in any of the pharmaceutical sciences. In 2012, the award recognizes contributions in the area of economic, social and administrative sciences (ESAS). Kimberlin will be recognized at the APhA Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans, March 9-12, 2012. The APhA awards and honors program is the most comprehensive recognition program in the profession of pharmacy.

A colleague nominated Kimberlin, writing, “It is fair to say that Dr. Kimberlin’s research and the dissemination of her work has directly shaped the role of today’s pharmacists in counseling and in patient education. She has performed direct work with caregivers and patients afflicted with the most devastating and debilitating diseases, including HIV/AIDS, chronic pain and pediatric cancer. Participants in the research have included patient populations that are the most vulnerable and needy, elderly patients and Medicaid recipients. Her influence even extends beyond her personal work to the numerous graduate students she has trained in theory and methods.”

Kimberlin is a Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, and serves as graduate coordinator for the department. Her research interests include patient decisions on medication use and the effects of pharmacist-patient relationships and communication variables on the patient’s understanding of therapy, as well as their health attitudes and adherence to therapy. She received a BS in English, MA in Educational Psychology and PhD in Counseling Psychology from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.

Another colleague noted, “A prime measure of Professor Kimberlin’s research achievement is her early and continuing commitment to research on communication. Beyond understanding communication, Professor Kimberlin has looked at outcomes of improved communication such as compliance and evaluating how well communication is provided. This aspect of her work also provides an important applied dimension. Her 20 years as the graduate program coordinator is one documentable measure, but her individual commitment as described by the students went beyond the expectations of that position. While this type of activity doesn’t get much publicity, Professor Kimberlin’s research achievements should be measured in part by the significant research success of these students, a number of whom are very successful scholars in their own right.”

Kimberlin was Principal Investigator (PI) on a recently completed FDA-funded project to evaluate consumer medication information leaflets dispensed with prescriptions in community pharmacies. She also was PI on a National Cancer Institute project, which interviewed cancer patients, family caregivers, pharmacists, physicians and nurses on barriers to effective communication between providers and patients regarding pain management. Kimberlin is currently serving on a Review Panel for Health Literacy grant applications with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and serves on the Limited English Proficiency and Pharmacy Practice Advisory Group formed by the National Health Law Program and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). She is a member of the American Psychological Association, AACP and APhA.

About the American Pharmacists Association 
The American Pharmacists Association, founded in 1852 as the American Pharmaceutical Association, is a 501 (c)(6) organization, representing more than 62,000 practicing pharmacists, pharmaceutical scientists, student pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and others interested in advancing the profession. APhA, dedicated to helping all pharmacists improve medication use and advance patient care, is the first-established and largest association of pharmacists in the United States.

About APhA-APRS 
The APhA-Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS) stimulates the discovery, dissemination and application of research to improve patient health and serves pharmacists and those members who are involved in the pharmaceutical sciences. Members of APhA may choose to belong to a primary section within APhA-APRS based on their area of research. APhA-APRS is governed by an Executive Council comprised of elected leaders from the three Sections of APhA-APRS: Basic Sciences, Clinical Sciences and Economic, Social and Administrative Sciences. Members receive access to continuing education, an online community for pharmacists, networking and leadership opportunities, premier research journals such as JAPhA and JPharmSci, cutting edge information on Medication Therapy Management and regulatory issues facing the profession.

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