Trump takes a first step toward returning medical supply chains to the U.S.

The Trump administration has awarded a $354 million contract to Phlow Corp., a Virginia start-up that will produce a variety of generic drugs and their ingredients at advanced manufacturing facilities in the United States. Over the past 20 years, most U.S.

The Trump administration has awarded a $354 million contract to Phlow Corp., a Virginia start-up that will produce a variety of generic drugs and their ingredients at advanced manufacturing facilities in the United States. Over the past 20 years, most U.S. generic drug production has shifted offshore, notably to sites in China and India, a dependence on foreign suppliers that has become controversial as the coronavirus pandemic rages. Phlow will lead a private sector team that will use a continuous chemical process rather than the step-by-step approach of traditional pharmaceutical manufacturing. AMPAC Fine Chemicals, Civica Rx, and the Medicines-for-All Institute at Virginia Commonwealth University round out the partnership. The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) awarded Phlow the contract. During the initial 4 years, the company says it will develop a "rapid surge" capability for critically-needed medicines and their ingredients and build advanced manufacturing facilities to produce drugs that are in short supply. Phlow promises higher yields, less waste, and more affordable medicines as a result of its continuous chemical process. To date, Phlow already has delivered to the government 1.6 million doses of antibiotics, sedatives, opioid analgesics, and blood pressure drugs. The contract can be extended to a 10-year total of $812 million, according to HHS, which oversees BARDA.