Sales of Juul e-cigarettes skyrocket, posing danger to youth

New CDC research highlights the increasing popularity of Juul e-cigarettes, finding that sales of the device rose more than seven-fold from 2016 to 2017. "The popularity of Juul among kids threatens our progress in reducing youth e-cigarette use," said Robert Redfield, MD, director of CDC.

New CDC research highlights the increasing popularity of Juul e-cigarettes, finding that sales of the device rose more than seven-fold from 2016 to 2017. "The popularity of Juul among kids threatens our progress in reducing youth e-cigarette use," said Robert Redfield, MD, director of CDC. "We are alarmed that these new high nicotine content e-cigarettes, marketed and sold in kid-friendly flavors, are so appealing to our nation's young people." The new study, reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association, noted that sales of e-cigarettes from British American Tobacco increased 146% during 2014 and led the market into 2017. However, during 2016–17, sales of Juul products rose 641%, from 2.2 million devices to more than 16 million. As of 2017, almost one-third of e-cigarette sales were from Juul Labs, giving it the biggest market share in the country. FDA recently announced that it has issued more than 1,300 warning letters and civil money penalty complaints to retailers who illegally sold e-cigarette products to youth. Additionally, the agency has requested information from Juul and other manufacturers about their marketing, youth appeal, and product design. "There are no redeeming benefits of e-cigarettes for young people," said Corinne Graffunder, DrPH, director of CDC's Office on Smoking and Health. "The use of certain USB-shaped e-cigarettes is especially dangerous among youth because these products contain extremely high levels of nicotine, which can harm the developing adolescent brain."