Restrictions are slowing coronavirus infections, new data suggest

Stay-at-home orders and other social distancing measures are contributing to rapid drops in the numbers of fevers recorded in states across the country, according to new data from the medical technology firm Kinsa Health. At least 248 million Americans in at least 29 states have been told to stay at home.

Stay-at-home orders and other social distancing measures are contributing to rapid drops in the numbers of fevers recorded in states across the country, according to new data from the medical technology firm Kinsa Health. At least 248 million Americans in at least 29 states have been told to stay at home. Kinsa Health, which produces internet-connected thermometers, first created a national map of fever levels on March 22 and was able to spot the trend within a day. Since then, data from the health departments of New York state and Washington state have buttressed the finding, making it clear that social distancing is saving lives. Kinsa's thermometers upload the user's temperature readings to a centralized database; the data enable the company to track fevers across the United States. Kinsa has more than 1 million thermometers in circulation and has been getting up to 162,000 daily temperature readings since COVID-19 began spreading in the country. The company normally uses that data to track the spread of influenza. Its predictions have routinely been 2-3 weeks ahead of those of CDC. To identify clusters of coronavirus infections, Kinsa recently adapted its software to detect spikes of "atypical fever" that do not correlate with historical flu patterns and are likely attributable to the coronavirus. As of noon Wednesday, the company's live map showed fevers holding steady or dropping almost universally across the country.