Pharmacogenomics coming to EMRs

A pharmacogenomics clinic has opened at NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, IL, among just a handful in the nation to focus exclusively on pharmacogenomics. NorthShore, with three hospitals in the very first group to achieve Stage 7 on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model, has long been nearly paperless.

A pharmacogenomics clinic has opened at NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, IL, among just a handful in the nation to focus exclusively on pharmacogenomics. NorthShore, with three hospitals in the very first group to achieve Stage 7 on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model, has long been nearly paperless. Mark Dunnenberger, senior clinical specialist in pharmacogenomics in NorthShore's Center for Molecular Medicine, envisions a future where every NorthShore patient will have pharmacogenomic data in their medical records. With this goal in mind, he and his team must figure out how to get pharmacogenomic issues into medical records so physicians can use it in practice. Dunnenberger says his team is working on building "systematic and discrete data points" into the medical record to make this information easily accessible to clinicians and compatible with clinical decision support systems. "It will be like doing drug–drug and drug–allergy checks," according to Dunnenberger. The Clinical Pharmacogenomics Implementation Consortium, supported by NIH and run by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, is driving the development of such data points.