Pharmacies using compliance tools significantly increase medication adherence among patients

A pilot program involving an appointment-based synchronization and compliance packaging tool helped to improve medication adherence scores among patients, as measured by proportion of days covered. The pilot program, conducted by CSS Health and Pharmacy First, found that pharmacists raised the proportion of days covered by up to 30%.

A pilot program involving an appointment-based synchronization and compliance packaging tool helped to improve medication adherence scores among patients, as measured by proportion of days covered. The pilot program, conducted by CSS Health and Pharmacy First, found that pharmacists raised the proportion of days covered by up to 30%. After 6 months, desirable changes in adherence were observed across various chronic disease states, including diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. Individual patients' adherence increased, on average, by 18.3% over 6 months. The effect was more significant for patients who had trouble adhering to their medications. Perry Larson, chief operating officer for Medicine-On-Time, a leader in the medication adherence market, observes: "The most effective way for pharmacists to positively impact medication adherence is to change patient behavior and make the entire process easier for the patient." At present, one-half of patients do not take medications as prescribed, resulting in poor clinical outcomes and costing the health care system up to $289 billion annually.