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Percentage of adults who reduced or delayed meds to save money

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CDC research shows that among adults aged 45–64 years who were prescribed any medication in 2015, people with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to have reduced or delayed medication in an effort to save money in the past year.

CDC research shows that among adults aged 45–64 years who were prescribed any medication in 2015, people with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to have reduced or delayed medication in an effort to save money in the past year. Specifically, 18.8% of people with diabetes reported reducing or delaying medication, compared with 9.6% of people without diabetes. Steps they took included skipping medication doses (13.2% vs. 6.4%), taking less medication (14.4% vs. 6.9%), and delaying filling a prescription (16.3% vs. 7.9%). For adults aged 65 years and older, people with diabetes were again more likely than those without diabetes to reduce or delay medication, at a rate of 6.8% compared with 4.7%, and to have used each of the cost-saving measures. Meanwhile, among all adults who were prescribed medication, individuals aged 45–64 years were more likely than older adults to reduce or delay taking their medications to save money. The findings were based on data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey.

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https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6625a5.htm?s_cid=mm6625a5_w

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