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Pediatric exposures to veterinary pharmaceuticals

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Safeguards are needed to prevent veterinary medications from getting into the hands of children, according to a study of documented cases at the Central Ohio Poison Center. The retrospective analysis included reported exposures from 1999 through 2013 involving anyone aged 19 years or younger.

Safeguards are needed to prevent veterinary medications from getting into the hands of children, according to a study of documented cases at the Central Ohio Poison Center. The retrospective analysis included reported exposures from 1999 through 2013 involving anyone aged 19 years or younger. The facility fielded a total of 1,431 related calls during the study period, most of which concerned children aged 5 years or younger. Veterinary drugs with no human equivalent, antimicrobials, and antiparasitics were the most common agents; ingestion was the most likely route of exposure; and curiosity was the primary driver of the behavior. While exposures generally were not expected to produce long-term health effects, the findings suggest a need for greater public awareness as well as appropriate dispensing and home storage practices for animal medications.

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http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2017/02/02/peds.2016-1496

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