The overdose drug naloxone is available in many states without a prescription

People can now buy naloxone without an individual prescription in 46 states. Legislation in the remaining states varies, with some allowing naloxone to be prescribed only for use on a patient of the prescriber, and others allowing it to be prescribed for use on the patient's family and friends as well.

People can now buy naloxone without an individual prescription in 46 states. Legislation in the remaining states varies, with some allowing naloxone to be prescribed only for use on a patient of the prescriber, and others allowing it to be prescribed for use on the patient's family and friends as well. Thom Duddy of Adapt Pharma, the maker of the Narcan nasal spray, says the purchase will be covered for most people with health insurance. Copayments will be $10 or less for 73% of those individuals, he said, and many uninsured people can obtain naloxone through Medicaid programs for a copay of $5 or less. In Maryland and Virginia, most people who attend free community training programs receive a pack of naloxone, and the District of Columbia's health department offers similar programs. Naloxone is available at community pharmacies in the District only via prescription, but at least three community health organizations offer it free without a prescription to clients and family members.