Oklahoma health board approves new medical marijuana rules

The Oklahoma Board of Health on Wednesday voted unanimously to adopt new guidelines for the use of medical marijuana in the state after earlier rules hastily adopted last month came under harsh criticism from the attorney general and medical marijuana advocates.

The Oklahoma Board of Health on Wednesday voted unanimously to adopt new guidelines for the use of medical marijuana in the state after earlier rules hastily adopted last month came under harsh criticism from the attorney general and medical marijuana advocates. The new rules amend or entirely revoke the previous guidelines, including eliminating a ban on the sale of smokable pot and requirements that a pharmacist be in every dispensary and that women of "childbearing age" undergo a pregnancy test. Also eliminated were guidelines that limited levels of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, in products and plants. The law is scheduled to go into effect 60 days after passage. Michael McNutt, communication secretary for Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, says the governor wants to review the new guidelines with her legal staff and has 45 days to accept or reject them. The original rules approved by the board earlier this month prompted outrage from medical marijuana supporters who said they were far too restrictive.