Ohio governor signs epinephrine bill into law

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio signed into law this week a measure that permits pharmacists to substitute a generic epinephrine auto-injector for a prescribed, brand-name epinephrine auto-injector. The Epinephrine Accessibility Act, sponsored by state Rep. Derek Merrin (R-Monclova Township), had been in the works for close to 2 years.

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio signed into law this week a measure that permits pharmacists to substitute a generic epinephrine auto-injector for a prescribed, brand-name epinephrine auto-injector. The Epinephrine Accessibility Act, sponsored by state Rep. Derek Merrin (R-Monclova Township), had been in the works for close to 2 years. "By relaxing restrictive barriers, pharmacists will be empowered to seamlessly ensure patients are provided less expensive epinephrine auto-injectors," Merrin explained. "The legislation makes it easier for EpiPen competitors to compete, which will ultimately lead to lower costs." According to the Ohio Pharmacists Association, the bill also permits pharmacists to dispense epinephrine auto-injectors to adults without a prescription, after the pharmacist has established that the individual has already received an initial epinephrine prescription. The bill will become law 91 days after it is filed with the Secretary of State's Office.