NSAID use among patients with a musculoskeletal disorder and hypertension, heart failure, or CKD

A retrospective cohort study conducted in Toronto sought to characterize the frequency and associations of prescription NSAID use among patients with high blood pressure, heart failure, or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Researchers were also interested to see if NSAID use correlated with short-term safety outcomes.

A retrospective cohort study conducted in Toronto sought to characterize the frequency and associations of prescription NSAID use among patients with high blood pressure, heart failure, or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Researchers were also interested to see if NSAID use correlated with short-term safety outcomes. The cohort included more than 814,000 individuals aged 65 years or older with a history of one of the three targeted conditions. Patients attended more than 2.4 million musculoskeletal-related primary care visits during the study period, and 9.3% of those sessions were followed by prescription NSAID use within the course of 1 week. Cardiovascular and renal safety outcomes were assessed for 8–37 days after each visit, but there was no difference based on comparisons of patients exposed to prescription NSAIDs and nonexposed patients. The researchers did discover that past NSAID users, patients with hypertension, and younger people were more likely to use prescription NSAIDs, while those with CKD, heart failure, previous opioid use, and hospitalization within the past year were less likely. In general, moreover, prescription NSAID users tended to be healthier and have less severe disease than nonusers.