Novartis injects itself into planned rollout of EpiPen competitor

Adamis Pharmaceuticals announced that Novartis subsidiary Sandoz will acquire the U.S. commercial rights for its epinephrine injector Symjepi, a potential competitor to Mylan's EpiPen. Adamis said that Sandoz will pay an upfront fee and make possible performance-based milestone payments for the rights, while net profits generated from U.S.

Adamis Pharmaceuticals announced that Novartis subsidiary Sandoz will acquire the U.S. commercial rights for its epinephrine injector Symjepi, a potential competitor to Mylan's EpiPen. Adamis said that Sandoz will pay an upfront fee and make possible performance-based milestone payments for the rights, while net profits generated from U.S. sales of Symjepi will be split between Adamis and the Novartis unit. Adamis said it would keep the rights to commercialize Symjepi internationally, but it has awarded Sandoz the first right of negotiation for such markets. In addition, Adamis may continue to develop its Symject injection platform for other product candidates, including a previously announced naloxone product candidate, the company said. FDA approved the Symjepi 0.3-mg injector last year, at which time Adamis said it planned to position Symjepi as a low-cost alternative to existing offerings. Adamis said if the deal with Sandoz is granted regulatory approval, it would also cover the Symjepi 0.15-mg injector.