NIH researchers estimate 17% of food-allergic children have sesame allergy

A recent study from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) found that about 17% of children with food allergies have a sesame allergy. Only 20%–30% of children with sesame allergy outgrow it, and severe reactions to sesame are common among sesame-allergic children.

A recent study from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) found that about 17% of children with food allergies have a sesame allergy. Only 20%–30% of children with sesame allergy outgrow it, and severe reactions to sesame are common among sesame-allergic children. In the study, NIAID researchers measured the amount of sesame-specific immunoglobulin E (slgE) in the blood of 88 children. These children were also offered an oral food test to determine their sesame-allergic status. With this data, the researchers developed a mathematical model for predicting the probability that a child with food allergy is allergic to sesame. The model indicated that children with more than 29.4 kilo IU of SlgE per liter of serum have more than a 50% chance of being allergic to sesame. The findings, published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, suggest that sesame antibody testing accurately predicts whether a child with a food allergy is allergic to sesame.