New York state lawmakers propose bill to let teens get vaccinations without parental approval

New York may join several other states, including Oregon and South Carolina, by allowing minors to request vaccines without their parents' approval. A bill being sponsored in both chambers of the New York legislature would allow any child aged 14 years and older to receive vaccinations or booster shots for a variety of diseases.

New York may join several other states, including Oregon and South Carolina, by allowing minors to request vaccines without their parents' approval. A bill being sponsored in both chambers of the New York legislature would allow any child aged 14 years and older to receive vaccinations or booster shots for a variety of diseases. The measure comes as concerns grow about measles outbreaks in New York. A majority of the 145 confirmed cases of measles in Rockland County, NY, involve children who did not receive vaccinations for measles, mumps, and rubella. City officials have also reported 100 cases of measles in Brooklyn and 1 case in Queens. State Sen. Liz Krueger, who is sponsoring the bill in New York's upper chamber, said the legislation would address how children can be put at risk by either an unengaged parent or one with prejudices. "It's not just the individual who is at risk when they are not immunized," she said. "You are putting other people at risk."