More than 9,000 U.S. health care workers have been infected with the coronavirus

Approximately 9,000 health care workers have had positive coronavirus tests as of April 9, according to a CDC analysis released Tuesday. Although most were not sick enough to be hospitalized, 27 died, CDC said. These numbers are believed to be an undercount of infections due to the continuing lack of available tests in many areas.

Approximately 9,000 health care workers have had positive coronavirus tests as of April 9, according to a CDC analysis released Tuesday. Although most were not sick enough to be hospitalized, 27 died, CDC said. These numbers are believed to be an undercount of infections due to the continuing lack of available tests in many areas. Some regions and institutions are no longer testing health care workers, reserving kits for the sickest patients. A separate CDC report on a case at a hospital in Solano County, CA, found that a patient who arrived on February 15 was discovered to have had COVID-19 11 days later. The report noted 121 staff had been exposed to the virus. Of the 43 staffers who subsequently experienced flu-like symptoms and were tested with nasal swabs, three had confirmed infections—making them among the first known cases of occupational transmission in a hospital. While two of those three workers were involved in higher-risk procedures that tend to kick the virus into the air, the third was not. "These findings underscore the heightened COVID-19 transmission risk associated with prolonged, unprotected patient contact," said CDC, which also called for early identification and prompt isolation of patients who are infected.