Moderna's coronavirus vaccine found to be nearly 95% effective in a preliminary analysis

Moderna's candidate coronavirus vaccine is nearly 95% effective at preventing illness, including severe cases, according to a preliminary analysis released Monday. The vaccine, co-developed with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at NIH, is being studied in 30,000 volunteers.

Moderna's candidate coronavirus vaccine is nearly 95% effective at preventing illness, including severe cases, according to a preliminary analysis released Monday. The vaccine, co-developed with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at NIH, is being studied in 30,000 volunteers. The preliminary data, which have not yet been published or peer reviewed, show that 90 of the 95 cases of COVID-19 were among placebo recipients. In addition, the 11 severe cases were all in the placebo group. An independent data committee, convened by NIH, analyzed the findings on Sunday. Moderna has said it will complete its trial before applying for emergency use authorization, so it will have to wait until there are 151 cases of COVID-19 in the trial. Although a previous forecast had indicated the trial could end in early 2021, it is now expected to reach its endpoint in 7-10 days, according to company CEO Stéphane Bancel, as the number of cases in the United States increases. The company's news release said the adverse effects of the two-dose vaccine were primarily mild or moderate, including pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain. Moderna noted its vaccine can be stable at refrigerator temperatures for a month, frozen for as long as 6 months, and will not require dilution at the point of care.