Long-term outcomes of patients with recent-onset RA after 10 years of tight controlled treatment

A recent study looked at long-term outcomes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after 10 years of targeted treatment in four treatment strategies. The treatment strategies included sequential monotherapy, step-up combination therapy, initial combination therapy with prednisone, or initial combination therapy with infliximab.

A recent study looked at long-term outcomes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after 10 years of targeted treatment in four treatment strategies. The treatment strategies included sequential monotherapy, step-up combination therapy, initial combination therapy with prednisone, or initial combination therapy with infliximab. The study involved 508 patients; 38% dropped out. At 10 years, the Health Assessment Questionnaire scores for the treatments were 0.69, 0.72, 0.64, and 0.58, respectively. At that point, 53% of patients were in remission and 14% were in drug-free remission, with no differences between the strategies. Radiographic damage was limited for all strategies and the standardized mortality ratio was 1.16 based on 72 observed and 62 expected deaths. According to the researchers, initial combination therapy "results in faster clinical improvement and targeted treatment determines long-term outcomes" for patients with early RA.