Influenza vaccine only 39% effective this past season, CDC panel says

The influenza vaccine was more effective against B/Victoria virus during the 2019–20 cycle than it was against A/H1N1pmd09, according to CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which calculated overall efficacy at 39%.

The influenza vaccine was more effective against B/Victoria virus during the 2019–20 cycle than it was against A/H1N1pmd09, according to CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which calculated overall efficacy at 39%. The panel was unanimously in favor of accepting vaccine changes for the upcoming influenza season—including adding asplenia, cochlear implant, and active cerebrospinal fluid leak as contraindications. In another unanimous vote, the 14 members agreed to include the meningococcal ACWY-TT (MenQuadfi—Sanofi) in the Vaccines for Children program as an option for meningococcal ACWY immunization. Approved in April of this year, the vaccine is indicated for individuals aged 2 years and older. ACIP's recommendation that anyone aged 6 months and older receive an annual influenza vaccine, assuming the absence of contraindications, remains in place for the 2020–21 influenza season. Two recently licensed vaccines—Fluzone High-Dose Quadrivalent (Sanofi Pasteur) and Fluad Quadrivalent (Seqirus)—will be among the options available going forward.