FDA expresses continued confidence in the safety and effectiveness of MMR vaccine

With an increasing number of measles outbreaks across the country and around the world, FDA is stressing its continued confidence in the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. CDC has reported that outbreaks of mumps have also been reported in the United States this year.

With an increasing number of measles outbreaks across the country and around the world, FDA is stressing its continued confidence in the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. CDC has reported that outbreaks of mumps have also been reported in the United States this year. In a statement, FDA's Peter Marks, MD, PhD, director of the agency's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, says: "It's an urgent public health priority to monitor these diseases and raise awareness of the importance of timely immunizations, especially as outbreaks are taking hold among unvaccinated populations in this country." According to Marks, "We cannot state strongly enough—the overwhelming scientific evidence shows that vaccines are among the most effective and safest interventions to both prevent individual illness and protect public health. Vaccinating against measles, mumps and rubella not only protects us and our children, it protects people who can't be vaccinated, including children with compromised immune systems due to illness and its treatment, such as cancer." Marks notes the efficacy of the MMR vaccine in protecting against the three diseases and against their complications, with nearly half a century of experience and evidence supporting that data. While the vaccine does have known potential adverse effects, Marks explains they are "generally mild and short-lived, such as rash and fever." Parents who are concerned about such adverse effects are advised to "speak with their health care providers about the benefits and risks of vaccines, along with the potential consequences of not vaccinating against diseases," Marks says.