Fauci worries U.S. COVID-19 cases could climb to 100,000 daily

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned Tuesday that the United States could soon have 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day "if this does not turn around." Such a surge would be more than twice as many as the record so far and three times as many as the original peak this spring.

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned Tuesday that the United States could soon have 100,000 new coronavirus cases a day "if this does not turn around." Such a surge would be more than twice as many as the record so far and three times as many as the original peak this spring. Fauci gave his assessment in response to questions from members of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. The hearing took place as governors of newly hard hit states, including Texas and Florida, have been rescinding reopening plans in the face of surging cases of the virus that has killed at least 124,000 people in the United States since February. Last weekend, the United States had a record daily number of confirmed new cases—44,792. That is 30% higher than 34,203 on April 25, the peak day in the original surge of cases this spring. Fauci also told senators that federal and state guidance this spring for people to stay at home to avoid exposure to the virus led about one-half of the United States to shut down—far less compliance than in many European countries, he said, where 95% of activities in those nations shut down. As a result, he said, the slowdown of the virus's spread among Americans has been less pronounced.