Experimental nasal influenza vaccine tested in kids, teens

Researcher at a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) site at Saint Louis University have launched an early-stage clinical trial of the safety and immune-stimulating ability of an experimental nasal influenza vaccine in children and teenagers. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases supports the VTEU.

Researcher at a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) site at Saint Louis University have launched an early-stage clinical trial of the safety and immune-stimulating ability of an experimental nasal influenza vaccine in children and teenagers. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases supports the VTEU. "We are hopeful that newer kinds of influenza vaccines, such as the candidate being tested in this trial, will provide protection even if their components do not precisely match the currently circulating influenza virus strains," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD. The trial will enroll 50 individuals aged 9–17 years. One-half of the participants will receive a nasal influenza vaccine made by FluGen, while the rest will receive a dose of inactive saline solution delivered as a nasal spray. All participants will receive an intramuscular injection of a licensed, quadrivalent seasonal influenza vaccine 3 months after receiving the initial nasal vaccine or placebo. One key objective will be to determine whether the combination of the licensed and experimental vaccine leads to greater protection about influenza viruses compared with licensed vaccine alone.