An EpiPen rival is about to return to the shelves

Kaléo, which owns the rights to the EpiPen alternative Auvi-Q, announced on Wednesday that the product will be brought back on the market in 2017. Whether the Auvi-Q's return will do much to lower prices is far from clear, especially since it cost more than the EpiPen before being taken off the market last year.

Kaléo, which owns the rights to the EpiPen alternative Auvi-Q, announced on Wednesday that the product will be brought back on the market in 2017. Whether the Auvi-Q's return will do much to lower prices is far from clear, especially since it cost more than the EpiPen before being taken off the market last year. A generic version of the EpiPen, recently announced by Mylan, is expected to be available before the end of the year, which may further lower the price of similar products. Spencer Williamson, CEO of Kaléo, said the company is working hard to ensure the product will be affordable, but indicated the list price has not yet been determined. When the Auvi-Q came on the market in 2013, it was hailed as a clever alternative to the EpiPen, with a slim, rectangular, pocket-friendly design and voice instructions that guided users through the injection process. The product was licensed to Sanofi, and within a couple of years, the Auvi-Q had about 10% of the market and a loyal following. But in 2015, Sanofi withdrew the product from the market after reports that it was not delivering proper doses of epinephrine. Last February, Kaléo executives reclaimed the rights to the product and began working on safely getting it back on the market, taking steps such as adding a fully automated production line with multiple quality checks.