Efficacy and safety of LY3298176 in patients with type 2 diabetes

A Phase II clinical trial focused on LY3298176, a novel intervention for type 2 diabetes. LY3298176 is both a glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist.

A Phase II clinical trial focused on LY3298176, a novel intervention for type 2 diabetes. LY3298176 is both a glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist. Researchers wondered how stimulating both of those receptors with LY3298176 would compare with stimulating just the GLP-1 receptors with dulaglutide or with placebo. The study randomized participants—adults with poor control of their type 2 diabetes—into six different treatment groups. Patients were assigned to receive one of four doses of LY3298176, to dulaglutide, or to placebo for a period of 26 weeks. Treatment was delivered subcutaneously once per week. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in HbA1c level from baseline in all participants who received at least one dose of the study drug and had at least one post-baseline measurement of any outcome. In the LY3298176 group, change in HbA1c increased with dosage level, with 33–90% of those patients lowering their HbA1c to below 7 and 15–82% bringing it down to at least 6.5. By comparison, 52% of the dulaglutide patients and 12% of controls achieved HbA1c of 7, while 39% and 2% achieved HbA1c of 6.5 or lower. The results indicate that LY3298176 demonstrated meaningfully better glucose control than dulaglutide, with an acceptable safety and tolerability profile. Thus, the investigators believe combined GIP and GLP-1 receptor stimulation might offer a new therapeutic option for treating type 2 diabetes.