COVID-19 drug remdesivir to cost $3,120 for typical patient

Gilead Sciences announced Monday that it expects to charge U.S. hospitals $3,120 for a typical COVID-19 patient who requires its drug remdesivir. Gilead will start charging for the drug in July, but federal and state officials will continue to determine which hospitals receive it.

Gilead Sciences announced Monday that it expects to charge U.S. hospitals $3,120 for a typical COVID-19 patient who requires its drug remdesivir. Gilead will start charging for the drug in July, but federal and state officials will continue to determine which hospitals receive it. Gilead expects to have sufficient supply by September to keep up with demand and distribute the drug in the same way it distributes other medicines. The company set a higher price for most U.S. patients, but a lower price will be extended to certain federal agencies, such as the Department of Veterans Affairs, Indian Health Service, Defense Department, and the Coast Guard, but not programs such as Medicare and Medicaid that do not directly purchase medicines, according to a Gilead spokesman. The government price will be $390 per dose, or $2,340 per patient for the shortest treatment course and $4,290 for a longer treatment course. Gilead says it will charge nongovernment buyers such as hospitals about $520 a dose for U.S. patients who are commercially insured, totaling $3,120 for a patient receiving the shorter course of treatment, and $5,720 for the longer treatment duration. The United States is the only developed country where Gilead will charge two prices, says Gilead CEO Daniel O'Day. In other nations, governments negotiate drug prices directly with drugmakers.