Could a rare, deadly 'superbug' fungus be gaining a foothold?

According to CDC data, the reach of superbug <i>Candida auris</i> has expanded from 7 cases nationwide in 2016 to 200 at the close of last year. Once it invades the bloodstream through wounds, ventilators, or catheters, the fungal infection is able to attack organs.

According to CDC data, the reach of superbug Candida auris has expanded from 7 cases nationwide in 2016 to 200 at the close of last year. Once it invades the bloodstream through wounds, ventilators, or catheters, the fungal infection is able to attack organs. While the condition is rare, it is difficult to detect and treat and is potentially fatal. CDC records indicate that an estimated 40% of patients infected with the superbug died, although their serious medical conditions made it difficult to ascertain how much of the blame C. auris deserved. Recent research suggests that a genetic mutation may allow the fungus to resist fluconazole, a widely used treatment for Candida infections; but a newer class of antifungal drugs, known as echinocandins, could be a viable alternative. In the meantime, CDC has launched a campaign to better help labs identify the fungus and to help prevent its spread.

Ad Position
Bottom Center Aligned