Consumers still feel comfortable picking up prescriptions at pharmacies, survey says

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has caused many people to delay nonemergency health care appointments and feel uncomfortable about visiting the hospital for treatment, a new survey shows it has not significantly affected American's feeling about going to the pharmacy in person.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has caused many people to delay nonemergency health care appointments and feel uncomfortable about visiting the hospital for treatment, a new survey shows it has not significantly affected American's feeling about going to the pharmacy in person. The Alliance of Community Health Plans surveyed more than 1,200 adults and found that 41% had postponed nonemergency medical appointments and 42% said they felt uncomfortable about going to the hospital for treatment. However, the survey also found that 49% of respondents said they felt "very comfortable" picking up prescriptions at their pharmacy and speaking with their pharmacists; 47% had received a new prescription in the last 90 days; and 90% of the individuals receiving new prescriptions in the last 90 days did so at a local community pharmacy. Additionally, the survey noted that 39% of respondents said they felt comfortable undergoing COVID-19 testing at a pharmacy, 24% had used a mail-order pharmacy in the past 90 days, and 9% had used their local pharmacy's home delivery service in that same period.