Cigarette smoking among U.S. adults lowest ever recorded

New data show that cigarette smoking has reached the lowest level ever recorded among U.S. adults, with an estimated 14% (34 million) adults saying they were current cigarette smokers in 2017.

New data show that cigarette smoking has reached the lowest level ever recorded among U.S. adults, with an estimated 14% (34 million) adults saying they were current cigarette smokers in 2017. The report—from CDC, FDA, and the National Cancer Institute—noted, however, that about 47 million adults still used a tobacco product last year, including a variety of smoked, smokeless, and electronic tobacco products. "This new all-time low in cigarette smoking among U.S. adults is a tremendous public health accomplishment—and it demonstrates the importance of continued proven strategies to reduce smoking," said CDC Director Robert Redfield. "Despite this progress, work remains to reduce the harmful health effects of tobacco use." According to data from the 2017 National Health Interview Survey, reported in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, cigarettes were used by 14% of adults; followed by cigars, cigarillos, or filtered little cigars (3.8%); e-cigarettes (2.8%); smokeless tobacco (2.1%); and pipes, water pipes, or hookahs (1%). Additionally, nearly 20% of the 47 million adults who report current use of tobacco products said they used two or more tobacco products. Despite the new low in cigarette smoking, it remains the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States, taking the lives of an estimated 480,000 individuals each year.