CDC: Pet-to-human transmission of coronavirus unlikely

Although there are documented cases of humans spreading the novel coronavirus to their pets, it is unlikely that domesticated animals can spread the virus to humans, according to a new report. Researchers from CDC and the Department of Agriculture studied two cases reports of domestic cats with confirmed coronavirus infection.

Although there are documented cases of humans spreading the novel coronavirus to their pets, it is unlikely that domesticated animals can spread the virus to humans, according to a new report. Researchers from CDC and the Department of Agriculture studied two cases reports of domestic cats with confirmed coronavirus infection. The cats live in separate households, though both in New York counties. The cats developed respiratory illness symptoms, including sneezing, ocular discharge, mild lethargy, and loss of appetite. The researchers note that one of the cats was overweight. This cat lived in an apartment with five people, including three who had shown signs of a mild respiratory illness and symptoms such as fever, cough, and sweating. None of those individuals were tested for the virus. The second cat lived with one individual who had confirmed COVID-19. Both cats recovered from their illness, and the first cat received an antibiotic, while the second cat did not receive treatment. While the findings confirm the possibility of humans transmitting the coronavirus to animals, the researchers stress that animals are not known to play a significant role in the virus. "Most cases of pets infected with SARS-CoV-2 worldwide occurred after close contact with people with COVID-19, so it appears that people can spread the virus to animals in some situations," a CDC spokesperson said. "We're still learning about the virus that causes COVID-19, but based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low."
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