California turns stadiums into COVID-19 vaccination centers

As California's COVID-19 cases surge to unprecedented levels, the state is converting baseball stadiums, fairgrounds, and a Disneyland Resort parking lot into large-scale vaccination sites. Gov. Gavin Newsom acknowledged the rollout of vaccines to medical workers and the most vulnerable older adults, such as those in care homes, has been slow.

As California's COVID-19 cases surge to unprecedented levels, the state is converting baseball stadiums, fairgrounds, and a Disneyland Resort parking lot into large-scale vaccination sites. Gov. Gavin Newsom acknowledged the rollout of vaccines to medical workers and the most vulnerable older adults, such as those in care homes, has been slow. He pledged the state will administer 1 million doses this week, more than twice the number done so far. To achieve that target, Newsom will deploy what he describes as "all-hands-on-deck approach" that includes the California National Guard, as well as pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, dentists, paramedics, and emergency medical technicians for administering the vaccines. The state set up a total of five mass vaccination sites in Los Angeles, San Diego, Anaheim, and Sacramento to immunize thousands of people daily. Christina Ghaly, MD, director of health services for Los Angeles County, said on Monday, nearly 8,000 people were hospitalized in Los Angeles County, which had fewer than 50 intensive care units available in an area with a population of 10 million people. Public health officials estimate that roughly 12% of people who contract COVID-19 will require hospital care, usually several weeks after infection as they get sicker.