The big number: 24% of young adults may have prediabetes in U.S., study shows

A recent CDC report indicates that 24% of young adults and 18% of adolescents in the United States have prediabetes. The condition indicates that the individual has a blood glucose level that is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes.

A recent CDC report indicates that 24% of young adults and 18% of adolescents in the United States have prediabetes. The condition indicates that the individual has a blood glucose level that is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. However, according to experts, some of diabetes' harmful effects can start with prediabetes. CDC said that many people with prediabetes have no symptoms, and most of the people who have it are not aware that they do. The new report, published in JAMA Pediatrics, is based on data collected from 2005–26 from a nationally representative sample of more than 5,700 people, aged 12–34 years. The report found that prediabetes was more common among male participants than female and among those who were obese compared with normal-weight youth and young adults. Furthermore, the adolescents and young adults with prediabetes were more likely to have various factors, such as high blood pressure, that put them at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.