Association of multivitamin and mineral supplementation and risk of CVD

Despite Americans' affinity for multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements, the cardiovascular (CV) benefits of taking them remain up for debate. The U.S.

Despite Americans' affinity for multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements, the cardiovascular (CV) benefits of taking them remain up for debate. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the National Institutes of Health recommend against routine use of MVM products for prevention of CVD or other chronic conditions, in fact, and the findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis support this view. Researchers identified 18 studies published between January 1970 and August 2016 that examined the relationship between MVM supplementation and CVD outcomes, including coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. More than 2 million participants from the general public were involved in the randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies. The authors of the review found no evidence of a correlation between supplement products and death from CVD, CHD, or stroke. Although MVMs did appear to be tied to a lower risk of CHD incidence, the finding did not convey in the pooled subgroup analysis of RCTs. Overall, the investigators conclude, the evidence does not support the use of MVM supplements for CV health in the general patient population.