Association between calcium or vitamin D supplementation and fracture incidence in community-dwelling older adults

A recent study investigated whether supplementation with calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D was associated with a lower fracture incidence in community-dwelling older adults. The meta-analysis involved 33 randomized clinical trials and more than 51,000 participants.

A recent study investigated whether supplementation with calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D was associated with a lower fracture incidence in community-dwelling older adults. The meta-analysis involved 33 randomized clinical trials and more than 51,000 participants. According to the researchers, there was no significant association of calcium or vitamin D with risk of hip fracture compared with placebo or no treatment. In addition, there was no significant association of combined calcium and vitamin D with hip fracture compared with placebo or no treatment. Furthermore, the researchers identified no significant associations between calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D supplements and the incidence of nonvertebral, vertebral, or total fractures. Based on subgroup analysis, the findings were generally consistent no matter the calcium or vitamin D dose, sex, fracture history, dietary calcium intake, and baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration. "These findings do not support the routine use of these supplements in community-dwelling older people," the researchers conclude.