Association of ACEI or ARB use with outcomes after AKI

A retrospective cohort study examined whether the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) following hospital discharge was associated with better outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI).

A retrospective cohort study examined whether the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) following hospital discharge was associated with better outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). The study used data from the Alberta Kidney Disease Network population database on more than 46,000 adults with an episode of KI during a hospitalization. The data show that 48% of patients received an ACEI or ARB within 6 months of discharge from the hospital. After adjusting for various factors related to the index hospitalization, the use of ACEIs or ARBs was linked to reduced mortality in AKI patients after 2 years. The authors note, however, that "ACEI or ARB use was also associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for a renal cause, mainly acute renal failure and hyperkalemia," so "cautious monitoring for renal-specific complications may be warranted."