Aspirin may be a good option to prevent blood clots after knee surgery

Costly anticoagulant drugs are often prescribed after knee surgery to prevent blood clots, but a new study in JAMA Surgery revealed that aspirin is effective, too. The study examined records of more than 40,000 patients who underwent knee surgery between 2013 and 2015.

Costly anticoagulant drugs are often prescribed after knee surgery to prevent blood clots, but a new study in JAMA Surgery revealed that aspirin is effective, too. The study examined records of more than 40,000 patients who underwent knee surgery between 2013 and 2015. Researchers found that the rate of thrombosis was 4.79% for those who received no medicine, 1.42% for individuals who were given prescription anticoagulants, and 1.31% for those who received both an anticoagulant and aspirin. The rate was 1.16% for patients who received aspirin alone. The statistical differences were insignificant. Additionally, the researchers found no difference between aspirin and the anticoagulants in the risk for bleeding complications. Senior study author Brian R. Hallstrom, MD, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Michigan, said he would still use anticoagulants for a patient who had a blood clot before. He noted, though, that "most people can get aspirin alone without much concern."