The American Heart Association takes on vaping

Research recently reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association estimates that e-cigarette use has caught on with 28% of high schoolers and 11% of middle schoolers.

Research recently reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association estimates that e-cigarette use has caught on with 28% of high schoolers and 11% of middle schoolers. According to Rose Marie Robertson, MD, deputy chief science and medical officer for the American Heart Association (AHA), the millions of children who currently vape offsets the great strides made in curbing the use of combustible cigarette use in young people over the years. Based on three surgeon general reports, she tells JAMA that her organization believes that minors should not be using these products at all because of the unregulated/unapproved compounds, toxic effects, and potential unknown health dangers. Armed with that science, AHA successfully litigated in favor of empowering FDA to regulate e-cigarettes along with combustible tobacco products, starting this year. Robertson also says that AHA will conduct $20 million worth of research on how and why adolescents are getting addicted to vaping and why it is so difficult for them to kick the habit. Additionally, the group will start collaborating with school superintendents and looking at the impact of policy decisions, such as abolishing flavored e-cigarettes that appeal to younger users.