Advocates push Connecticut legislators for price caps on insulin and cost-savings for the uninsured

At a recent listening session of Connecticut's joint Committee on Insurance and Real Estate, legislators heard arguments regarding a proposed bill that would cap the price of insulin at $25 for insured patients to purchase a 1-month supply of the medication.

At a recent listening session of Connecticut's joint Committee on Insurance and Real Estate, legislators heard arguments regarding a proposed bill that would cap the price of insulin at $25 for insured patients to purchase a 1-month supply of the medication. In addition, the bill would establish a working group to study whether more patients with diabetes can access lower-cost insulin through the federal 340b program, which allows qualified health providers to purchase prescription drugs at prices much lower than the market rate. If the bill is passed, Connecticut would be the ninth state to approve a cap on insulin prices, after six states approved caps earlier this year. The $25 cap would give Connecticut the lowest cap, along with New Mexico. Susan Halpin, executive director for the Connecticut Association of Health Plans, warned that a proposed cap on insulin prices would shift the cost onto insurers without addressing the root cause of the high prices. Meanwhile, some advocates for price controls said the bill did not go far enough to protect the uninsured. Another provision of the bill would allow pharmacists to dispense a 30-day supply of insulin to patients running out of the medicine but lacking a prescription for a refill.