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Surveillance of vaccination coverage among adult populations

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Although immunization is recommended through all phases of life, low vaccine uptake among individuals aged 19 years or older has increased the rate of vaccine-preventable disease in adults compared with children.

Although immunization is recommended through all phases of life, low vaccine uptake among individuals aged 19 years or older has increased the rate of vaccine-preventable disease in adults compared with children. Data from the National Health Interview Survey indicates that adult vaccination coverage in 2015 was not much changed from the previous year. There was however, slight improvement in vaccine takeup rates for influenza among individuals aged 19 years or older; for pneumococcal among adults with elevated risk aged 19–64 years; for tetanus, diphtheria with acellular pertussis (Tdap) among persons aged 19 years or older and adults aged 19–64 years; and for hepatitis B among health care professionals aged 19 years or older. More older Americans were immunized against shingles; and, notably, vaccination coverage for herpes zoster in 2015 met the Healthy People 2020 target of 30%. Overall, though, vaccination was more prevalent among whites, insured individuals, U.S.-born persons, and people with regular physician contact. To close the gap, successful evidence-based practices should be dispatched in these populations.
These include routinely recommending and offering necessary vaccines to adults, adopting reminder-recall systems, and using standing-order programs, among others.

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https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/ss/ss6611a1.htm

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