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Methamphetamine, the forgotten killer, is back

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The scourge of crystal methamphetamine has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance. In Oregon, meth-related deaths vastly outnumber those from heroin. At the U.S.

The scourge of crystal methamphetamine has been all but forgotten amid national concern over the opioid crisis. But 12 years after Congress took aggressive action to curtail it, meth has returned with a vengeance. In Oregon, meth-related deaths vastly outnumber those from heroin. At the U.S. border, agents are seizing 10 to 20 times the amounts they did a decade ago. Methamphetamine, experts say, has never been purer, cheaper or more lethal. In 2005 Congress passed the Combat Methamphetamine Act, which put pseudoephedrine behind the counter at pharmacies, limited sales to 7.5 grams per customer in a 30-day period, and required pharmacies to track sales. However, when the ingredients became difficult to come by in the United States, Mexican drug cartels inundated the market with so much pure, low-cost meth that dealers have more of it than they know what to do with. Under pressure from traffickers to unload large quantities, law enforcement officials say, dealers are even offering meth to customers on credit. Nationally, nearly 6,000 people died from stimulant use—mostly meth—in 2015, a 255% increase from 2005, according to CDC. The percentage of the nation's drug overdose toll that was attributed to stimulants inched up to 11% of the deaths.

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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/13/us/meth-crystal-drug.html

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