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Demonstrated value in the public health arena: Overcoming societal-level barriers to vaccination through patient relationships

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“If I get the flu, then I’ll just take medication. I’m not high risk. I never get sick.” As pharmacists, we have heard every excuse why patients choose not to vaccinate. Communication theorists hypothesize that the lay population more often makes health decisions, such as whether to vaccinate, based on their belief systems rather than government-sponsored or “authoritarian” influences.1 In other words, patient-level variables such as relationships, local communities, and value systems may be more influential on the decision to vaccinate than variables that affect patients on a societal level, such as insurance plans or vaccine-related laws.
URL: 
http://www.japha.org/article/S1544-3191(17)30795-1/fulltext?rss=yes

“If I get the flu, then I’ll just take medication. I’m not high risk. I never get sick.” As pharmacists, we have heard every excuse why patients choose not to vaccinate. Communication theorists hypothesize that the lay population more often makes health decisions, such as whether to vaccinate, based on their belief systems rather than government-sponsored or “authoritarian” influences.1 In other words, patient-level variables such as relationships, local communities, and value systems may be more influential on the decision to vaccinate than variables that affect patients on a societal level, such as insurance plans or vaccine-related laws.

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