Advertisement

Antipsychotic drug use in pregnancy appears to pose minimal risk

Share This Page
Mental illness during pregnancy is common, with around 10% of women experiencing depressive illness or anxiety disorder. There is limited evidence concerning the effect of antipsychotic drugs during pregnancy, so researchers launched a study to determine the maternal medical and perinatal outcomes associated with such drug use.

Mental illness during pregnancy is common, with around 10% of women experiencing depressive illness or anxiety disorder. There is limited evidence concerning the effect of antipsychotic drugs during pregnancy, so researchers launched a study to determine the maternal medical and perinatal outcomes associated with such drug use. A total of 1,021 women who used antipsychotic medication and gave birth to a single child were compared with 1,021 nonusers. The main outcomes measured were gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and venous thromboembolism. The findings showed that women who took antipsychotic medication were not at a higher risk for any of those outcomes compared with their nonusing counterparts. The preterm birth rate was not relatively different between the groups. The researchers concluded that antipsychotic drug use during pregnancy had little influence with the determined outcomes, but the rate of adverse outcomes pointed to the need for caution when prescribing the medication. An editorial accompanying the study suggests that pregnant women and clinicians "need to be guided by individual risk-benefit analyses, which take into account the diagnosis, severity of illness, past response to treatment, medical comorbidities, likely risks to the mother and her unborn baby should she stop treatment, safety profiles of individual drugs, and personal preferences and choices."

Ad Position: 
Bottom Center Aligned
http://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h2298

Advertisement

Related Content

block-views-related-content-block